Category Archives: Neuroethics

Why Cognitive Enhancement Is in Your Future (and Your Past)

It could be that we are on the verge of a great deluge of cognitive enhancement. Or it’s possible that new brain-enhancing drugs and technologies will be nothing compared to how we’ve transformed our minds in the past. If it … Continue reading

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Strange food for thought

The brain-gain revolution is already under way. But will these “neural enhancement” drugs turn us into Einsteins or Frankensteins? more

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It’s life, but not as God planned it

Scientists are often accused of trying to play God. Cloning experts, genetic engineers and atomic physicists have all fiddled with aspects of the world that many believe should remain the preserve of some higher power. more

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Mind-reading machine knows what you see

It is possible to read someone`s mind by remotely measuring their brain activity, researchers have shown. The technique can even extract information from subjects that they are not aware of themselves. more

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Scientists control mood

Science is beginning to find ways to control happiness in the brain artificially. more

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An Anti-Addiction Pill?

While many in the treatment field have long called addiction a “disease,” they’ve used the word in vague and metaphorical ways, meaning everything from a disease of the mind to a disease of the spirit. Many assumed that an addict … Continue reading

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Doctors fear gambling explosion

GPs tend not to refer people for treatment as there are perceived to be much more serious mental health and addiction problems. more

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When the Personality Disorder Wears Camouflage

Which raises a question: How does someone with a personality disorder “a significant, disabling, and dangerous condition” manage the stress of combat? Wouldn’t a person with a serious mental problem drop out, or be identified and quickly discharged? more

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Brain sensor allows mind-control

But Professor Miguel Nicolelis, a neurobiologist from Duke University, was critical of the research. He said: “When you decide, like this company did, to go into clinical trials for an invasive technique the stakes are very high.” more

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Science has designs on your brain

Should technology be used to stimulate and improve the brain – improving grades for instance? more

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